J. Edgar Hoover

WAS J. EDGAR HOOVER PASSING FOR WHITE?

There is a possibility that former FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover may have been passing for white according to author Millie L. McGhee.  If true, this could be one of the biggest cover-ups of the century.  Especially, since Hoover had a open disdain for Blacks, he also showed a dislike for Homosexuals and was allegedly involved in a questionable relationship with a fellow FBI agent named Clyde Tolson.  It has been rumored that Hoover left Tolson the bulk of his estate.

Was J. Edgar Hoover the poster child for self-hatred?  Millie L. McGhee an African-American woman, says Hoover was definitely passing for white and that she is Hoover's biological cousin. 

McGhee has written a book on the subject "Secrets Uncovered." McGhee presents startling evidence to backup her claims.  J. Edgar Hoover's father, Ivy Hoover was the bi-racial son of a white slave owner and a black slave woman.  Hoover knew he had black blood and did everything in his power to suppress this information.  He had his records tampered with to make his lineage appear white.

McGhee alleges that Hoover sent five FBI agents to remove clues of his ancestry in a historical document.  Tampered evidence was also uncovered in the Census records of the Hoover family's Mississippi and Washington, D.C. roots.  Hoover's birth certificate is also questioned, his parent's names appear to be penciled in and the initials w.m. defined as white male appears under his name.

Author Curt Gentry makes the same claims in his book "J. Edgar Hoover: The Man And His Secrets." While doing research for the book, McGhee tracked down a distant relative named Kan.  She confirmed McGhee's suspicions.  J. Edgar Hoover was their relative and he had African-American blood.  Kan produced photos of distant relatives, the resemblance to Hoover was unmistakable.  These photos also confirmed generations of inter-racial breeding which made Hoover so light in complexion that he was able to pass for a white man.

Source: "Secrets Uncovered" by Millie L. McGhee